Two new associate-degree graduates were hired for the pediatric unit. Both worked three 12-hour shifts a week, Jan in the day-to-evening shift and Ronnie at night.Whenever their shifts connected, they would compare notes on their experience. Jan felt she

  

Two new associate-degree graduates were hired for the pediatric unit. Both worked three 12-hour

shifts a week, Jan in the day-to-evening shift and Ronnie at night.Whenever their shifts

connected, they would compare notes on their experience. Jan felt she was learning rapidly,

gaining clinical skills and beginning to feel at ease with her colleagues. Ronnie, however, still

felt unsure of herself and often isolated. “There have been times,” she told Jan, “that I am the

only registered nurse on the unit all night. The aides and LPNs are really experienced, but that’s

not enough. I wish I could work with an experienced nurse as you are doing.” “Ronnie, you are

not even finished with your 3-month orientation program,” said Jan. “You should never be left

alone with all these sick children. Neither of us is ready for that kind of responsibility. And how

will you get the experience you need with no experienced nurses to help you? You must speak to

our nurse manager about this.” “I know I should, but she’s so hard to reach. I’ve called several

times, and she’s never available. She leaves all the shift assignments to her assistant. I’m not sure

she even reviews the schedule before it’s posted.” “You will have to try harder to reach her.

Maybe you could stay past the end of your shift one morning and meet with her,” suggested Jan.

“If something happens when you are the only nurse on the unit, you will be held responsible.”

In what ways has Ronnie been an effective follower? In what ways has Ronnie not been so

effective as a follower?

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